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Document Student Learning through Google Drive (part I)

Some of us still carry home bags full of student work. Yuck! I know I hated those days. Stuff would get lost (I mean mis-placed), I would spill things on work, sometimes names weren't written on work samples. It got pretty annoying at times. I know you've felt the same. 

With the adoption of Google Apps for Education (#GAFE) the transition from collecting concrete paper work samples to digital samples has been a breath of fresh digital air. 


Photo Taken from Stefanie Knowlton article: Mentoring pays off for Salem-Keizer teachers


Ok so even if you are not a techie...its still pretty easy. Let me show you. Actually here is Avi Spector who can show you how he can easily record video through the Google Drive app and have it uploaded without worry. 



Avi shows us the simplicity of recording video. Lets say your students doing a presentation and you wanted to assess it at another time. Or better yet, why don't you put the ownership in the hands of the students! Provide students with a device and allow them to take the video and upload it to a shared Google Drive folder. The recording is done for you and all you have to do now as a teacher is simply watch it and provide feedback. 

How much extra work did that take? Virtually none. And how much work did you carry home in your bag? Here let me check your bag for you... wow there's nothing in there but an empty lunch bag. Great work teacher! You are well on your way to having more free time for yourself. 

Here are a few things to consider when taking a video:
  • Who is looking at the video? Ethically, is it ok to share this video with other teachers? Parents? Students? 
  • Have you received permission from the student(s) to video record them?
  • Is it your personal devices or a school device or a student device that is being used to record? 
All of these issues are concerns that every teacher needs to address and discuss with their students and or site administrator for possible legal and ethical reasons. 

If you have any thoughts about what you have read or have come across any issues yourself, please share with us below in the comment section or drop us a line on Twitter @inquireinspire. 

Part II will look at documenting student data through observation, anecdotal notes. 

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